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  • Thieves Like Us (R)

    Robert Altman's good-natured reluctance to be moved by the most common forms of sentiment yields, in this 1974 remake of Nicholas Ray's They Live by Night, a cool, at times unbearably objective look at the fragile relationship between two rather ordinary young people in Depression America (Keith Carradine and Shelley Duvall), who happen to rob banks and get shot at a lot. more...
  • Killing Them Softly (R)

    Producer Brad Pitt and writer-director Andrew Dominik team up again after their critically acclaimed The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007), switching genres from western to crime—their source material is George V. Higgins's 1974 novel Cogan's Trade—but focusing again on the talk of hardened men. more...
  • End of Watch (R)

    I'm not sure who appointed David Ayer poet laureate for the LAPD, but at least he takes the job seriously; along with the usual mean-streets bluster and brutality, his cop-thriller screenplays (Training Day, Dark Blue) conscientiously record the hardening effects of a thankless and frequently pointless job. more...
  • Odds Against Tomorrow

    This ambitious but mainly unsuccessful 1959 black-and-white heist thriller—a loose adaptation of a John P. McGivern novel, credited to John O. Killens and Nelson Gidding but written by the blacklisted Abraham Polonsky—founders on allegorical positioning, although the location photography of Manhattan and upstate New York has its moments. more...
  • Gomorrah (NR)

    This Italian crime saga opens with a Godfather-style set piece in which three hoods are assassinated in the gleaming blue light of a tanning salon, which culminates in serial close-ups of their purple-spattered corpses. more...
  • Scarlet Street

    Fritz Lang's most harrowing study of guilt and damnation, this 1945 feature is a remake of Jean Renoir's La Chienne, with Edward G. Robinson as a quietly suffering bookkeeper who encounters fate in the form of a calculating prostitute (Joan Bennett) and her pimp (Dan Duryea). more...
  • The Glass Shield

    The fourth feature (1995) by this country's most gifted black filmmaker, Charles Burnett (Killer of Sheep), is his first with a directly political edge—a heartfelt and persuasive look at the racism and corruption of the Los Angeles police force, based on a true story and calculated to burn its hard lessons straight into your skull. more...