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  • American Hustle (R)

    David O. Russell's fictionalized drama about Abscam, the FBI sting operation that nailed more than a half dozen U.S. legislators on bribery and conspiracy charges, made me nostalgic for the 70s—not for all the bad hair, splayed collars, gold chains, and plunging necklines, but for an era when grown-up movies like this one came out almost every week. more...
  • Animal Kingdom (R)

    In the opening shot of this tense Australian noir, a comfy domestic scene turns lurid and tragic in the blink of an eye, which is a pretty good encapsulation of the entire movie. more...
  • Black Mass
  • Black Mass (R)

    Based on a nonfiction book by Dick Lehr and Gerard O'Neill, this crime saga details the corrupt partnership between South Boston crime lord James "Whitey" Bulger (a balding, unrecognizable Johnny Depp) and FBI agent John Connolly (Joel Edgerton), an old pal who cultivated Bulger as an informant but may have done more to help his criminal empire than Bulger did to help the bureau. more...
  • Coffy (R)

    Pam Grier, with revenge on her mind and a shotgun in her hand, blasts her way through a succession of pimps, hoods, cops, pushers, and politicians in this gory, violent 1973 entry in the Brown Sugar genre. more...
  • Collateral (R)

    Transpiring over a ten-hour nocturnal stretch in diverse Los Angeles locations, this engaging crime thriller by Michael Mann (2004) often suggests a low-budget 40s noir blown up to blockbuster proportions, an enlargement carried out with relative ease. more...
  • Dog Day Afternoon (R)

    One of Sidney Lumet's best jobs of directing (1975) and one of Al Pacino's best performances (as a bisexual bank robber) come together in a populist thriller with lots of New York juice. more...
  • Dom Hemingway
  • Dom Hemingway (R)

    "Jude Law is Dom Hemingway," reads the poster for this British comedy—just in case you needed some persuading that the poised, delicately handsome actor could pull off his role as a brutal, randy, flamboyant, explosively angry ex-con. more...
  • The Drop
  • The Drop (R)

    James Gandolfini, in his last movie role, plays the mobbed-up owner of a Brooklyn workingman's bar, but the more impressive performance here comes from Tom Hardy as his younger cousin, a guileless soul who tends bar and worries that they've gotten themselves in too deep. more...
  • End of Watch (R)

    I'm not sure who appointed David Ayer poet laureate for the LAPD, but at least he takes the job seriously; along with the usual mean-streets bluster and brutality, his cop-thriller screenplays (Training Day, Dark Blue) conscientiously record the hardening effects of a thankless and frequently pointless job. more...
  • Foxcatcher
  • Foxcatcher (R)

    Bennett Miller follows his acclaimed Moneyball (2011) with the story of Olympic philanthropist John Eleuthère du Pont, and as in the earlier movie, competitive sports becomes the vehicle for a brutal economics lesson. more...
  • The Godfather, Part II (R)

    Three hours and 20 minutes of Al Pacino suffering openly, Robert Duvall suffering silently, Diane Keaton suffering noisily, and (every so often) Robert De Niro suffering good-naturedly is almost too much, but Francis Ford Coppola pulls it off in grand style. more...