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  • Admission (PG-13)

    Tina Fey stars as a Princeton admissions screener who begins to reconsider her school's elitism when she meets a promising young applicant who may be the son she gave away for adoption; Paul Rudd provides romantic interest as the boy's teacher at a progressive school. more...
  • American Honey
  • American Honey (R)

    In this entrancing road movie from British filmmaker Andrea Arnold (Fish Tank), an abused teen (Sasha Lane) joins a cadre of other wayward young adults who sell magazines door-to-door across the midwest. more...
  • Are You Here
  • Are You Here (R)

    For all the talk about movies being supplanted by cable TV series, this big-screen debut from Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner proves that writing a feature film is a lot harder than it looks. more...
  • The Art of Getting By (PG-13)

    For all his reliance on teen-movie formula, writer-director Gavin Wiesen is surprisingly adept at depicting messy emotions and capturing the spontaneity of adolescence. more...
  • Arthur Newman (R)

    Deeply dissatisfied with his life, a white-collar nobody (Colin Firth) fakes his death, abandons his girlfriend and estranged young son, and embarks on a road trip to Indiana, where a dream job as a pro trainer on a golf course awaits him. more...
  • August: Osage County
  • August: Osage County (R)

    An all-star cast—Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Ewan McGregor, Chris Cooper, Julianne Nicholson, Sam Shepard, Dermot Mulroney, Juliette Lewis, Benedict Cumberbatch—pile aboard Tracy Letts's Pulitzer Prize-winning play about a resentful family reuniting in small-town Oklahoma. more...
  • Autoerotic (NR)

    In the films of Joe Swanberg, sex serves chiefly as a catalyst for loneliness and frustration, but that unhappy worldview turns comic in this collection of bawdy vignettes he codirected with horror specialist Adam Wingard (Pop Skull). more...
  • Begin Again
  • Begin Again (R)

    John Carney's cult favorite Once (2006) took a thin love story and filled it out with magical scenes of musical improvisation and discovery; this follow-up works the same way, its soft-rock bonhomie prevailing over a story that often registers as trite or naive. more...
  • The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13)

    An assortment of aging Brits (Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Judi Dench, Tom Wilkinson, Penelope Wilton, Celia Imrie) respond to an advertisement for a luxurious retirement hotel in Jaipur, India, that turns out to be a picturesque dump run by an ingratiating young local (Dev Patel of Slumdog Millionaire). more...
  • The Big Short
  • The Big Short (R)

    In the mid-2000s, the banks that serve as the pillars of the U.S. financial system defrauded the American people, caused the worst global economic crisis since the Great Depression, and essentially got away with it. more...
  • Blue Jasmine (PG-13)

    Woody Allen recycles some elements from one of his worst movies, Melinda and Melinda (2004), improving upon them considerably. more...
  • Burnt
  • Burnt (R)

    A rock-star chef (Bradley Cooper), trying for a professional comeback after bottoming out as an addict, hires on at a London restaurant, where he bickers with the haughty owner (Daniel Brühl) and jousts romantically with a talented sous chef (Sienna Miller). more...
  • Captain Fantastic (R)

    This odd duck by writer-director Matt Ross plays like a survivalist's remake of The Seven Little Foys (1955), that old Bob Hope movie about a widowed vaudevillian struggling to care for his brood of wacky, free-spirited children. more...
  • Chef
  • Chef (R)

    Chef, the new comedy written, directed by, and starring Jon Favreau, is being marketed as an independent film, and so it is to a certain extent. more...