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  • Fast Times at Ridgemont High (R)

    This 1982 first feature by Amy Heckerling (Clueless), based on Cameron Crowe's nonfiction book about teenagers at a southern California high school in the 70s, was never all it was cracked up to be. more...
  • Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (R)

    Hunter S. Thompson's 1971 account of taking drugs and behaving like an asshole in Las Vegas yields a singularly unpleasant 1998 feature from writer-director Terry Gilliam, though one with a lot of creativity and a scuzzy integrity of its own. more...
  • 50/50 (R)

    Young people battling cancer aren't exactly a staple of movie comedy, but this nervy project from director Jonathan Levine (The Wackness) mines a remarkable number of laughs from the situation. more...
  • 50/50 (R)

    Young people battling cancer aren't exactly a staple of movie comedy, but this nervy project from director Jonathan Levine (The Wackness) mines a remarkable number of laughs from the situation. more...
  • Foxes (R)

    Adrian Lyne (Flashdance, Fatal Attraction) made his directing debut with this 1980 drama about teenage girls in the San Fernando Valley. more...
  • Frank
  • Frank (R)

    Despite the contemporary setting, this offbeat British comedy was inspired by the career of 80s avant-pop musician Chris Sievey, who performed wearing a giant papier-mache head and calling himself Frank Sidebottom. more...
  • Ghost World (R)

    Terry Zwigoff (Crumb) brilliantly negotiates the shift to fiction filmmaking in a very personal adaptation of the Daniel Clowes comic book, which either captures with uncanny precision what it's like to be a teenage girl in this country or fooled me utterly into thinking it does. more...
  • The Girl From Monaco (R)

    A high-powered defense attorney (Fabrice Luchini) and the bodyguard assigned to him during a murder trial (Roschdy Zem) clash over a beautiful, salacious TV weather announcer (Louise Bourgoin) in this frequently hilarious bedroom comedy by the cagey French writer-director Anne Fontaine (How I Killed My Father). more...
  • The Good Guy (R)

    Any movie that name-checks Ford Maddox Ford's novel The Good Soldier is OK by me, and clearly writer-director Julio DePietro has made a careful study of Ford's crafty, illusory narrative. more...
  • The Grand Budapest Hotel
  • The Grand Budapest Hotel (R)

    Even if you've never seen a Wes Anderson movie, you've probably seen the American Express commercial he made in 2004, which was ubiquitous on American TV: between takes on a movie set the hip young director marches around giving instructions to his actors, noting the makeup job on a geisha character, conferring with his prop man on a suitable weapon for a scene ("Can you do a .357 with a bayonet?"), and putting a $15,000 helicopter rental on his AmEx before he seats himself on a camera crane and floats heavenward. more...
  • Grandma
  • Grandma (R)

    The pistol-packin' granny has been a comedy archetype for years, but it turns out to be the role of a lifetime for Lily Tomlin, whose tour de force performance lights up this well-written escapade by Paul Weitz (About a Boy). more...
  • Greenberg (R)

    A young personal assistant (Greta Gerwig of Hannah Takes the Stairs) house-sitting for her vacationing boss finds herself sharing the place with his neurotic brother (Ben Stiller), who's on the mend—or not—from a nervous breakdown. more...
  • HappyThankYouMorePlease (R)

    A self-help book disguised as a movie, this romantic comedy combines stories of angst-ridden New York singles with the kind of uplifting homilies found in bestsellers like The Happiness Project and Simple Abundance. more...