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  • Faust

    The great F.W. Murnau directed only one real blockbuster in Germany, just before coming to America to make his masterpiece, Sunrise; extravagant in every sense, Faust (1926) is laden with references to Dutch, German, and Italian painting and was rivaled only by Fritz Lang's Metropolis in driving the UFA studio toward bankruptcy. more...
  • Our Daily Bread

    A marvelously clearheaded bit of Depression-era agitprop, King Vidor's independently financed and produced 1934 fable, about an ordinary young couple who establish a communal society and lick the problems of social strife, hunger, and unemployment, is saved from excessive sentimentality by the straightforward presentation of Vidor's utopian notions and by the stylishness of his mise-en-scene. more...
  • It's a Gift

    W.C. Fields is a small-town grocer who inherits a fortune, buys an orange grove in California, and piles his wife and kids into their ramshackle car for a journey west. more...
  • Lady Windermere's Fan

    One of Ernst Lubitsch's greatest accomplishments, this 1925 filming of the Oscar Wilde classic neatly synthesizes the best elements of silent comedy and melodrama without ever falling into either trivia or heavy-handedness. more...
  • Nazarin

    In Mexico in 1900, under the regime of dictator Porfirio Diaz, a priest attempts to live the life of Christ and meets only humiliation and hostility. more...
  • Hellzapoppin'

    Rarely shown in the U.S. these days, this 1941 film of the wildly deconstructive stage farce with Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson is still regarded as a classic in Europe, and it lives up to its reputation. more...
  • The Long Voyage Home

    The revisionist view of this 1940 adaptation by John Ford and Dudley Nichols of four one-act plays by Eugene O'Neill downgrades it in favor of the once-neglected Ford westerns—in large part because, unlike the westerns, it was widely praised when it first came out. more...
  • Ruggles of Red Gap

    A warm, elegant comedy (1935) by Leo McCarey, about an English butler (Charles Laughton) who suddenly finds himself in the wild west when an American wins him in a poker game. more...