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  • Blast!

    Accomplished documentarian Paul Devlin (Power Trip) chronicles the efforts of his astronomer brother, Mark, and an international research team to launch an advanced telescope from the polar wastes to the edge of space via hot-air balloon. more...
  • Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (R)

    By far the most underrated of Sam Peckinpah's films, this grim 1974 tale about a minor-league piano player in Mexico (Warren Oates) who sacrifices his love (Isela Vega) when he goes after a fortune as a bounty hunter is certainly one of the director's most personal and obsessive works—even comparable in some respects to Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano in its bottomless despair and bombastic self-hatred, as well as its rather ghoulish lyricism. more...
  • Coffy (R)

    Pam Grier, with revenge on her mind and a shotgun in her hand, blasts her way through a succession of pimps, hoods, cops, pushers, and politicians in this gory, violent 1973 entry in the Brown Sugar genre. more...
  • Come Drink With Me

    A landmark of Hong Kong cinema, this blend of folktale, opera, acrobatics, and effects (1966), directed in 'Scope by King Hu (A Touch of Zen), ignited a contemporary craze for wuxia pian (swordplay pictures), which eventually led to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. more...
  • The Crazies

    A little-seen 1973 film by George Romero (Night of the Living Dead), whose excellent work combines intense, fleshy horror with elements of fierce satire and surprisingly appropriate socioeconomic analysis--all of which is pretty impressive for a shoestring producer from Pittsburgh. more...
  • Death Race 2000
  • Death Race 2000 (R)

    Vintage 1975 sleazebucket production from Roger Corman's New World Pictures, loaded with sex, violence, and general vulgarity, but orchestrated by one of the most interesting personalities then operating in the exploitation field, Paul Bartel (director of the notorious Private Parts and, later, Eating Raoul). more...
  • Dirty Ho

    Essentially a comedy, this Shaw brothers-produced kung fu film from 1979 is lighter and more irreverent than most of the studio's work from that era. more...
  • The Driller Killer

    I put off seeing Abel Ferrara's second feature (which came after his pseudonymous Nine Lives of a Wet Pussy) for years because of its title, but when I finally caught up with it I found it a lot more interesting and substantial than I'd imagined—and only incidentally the exploitation horror item it was apparently supposed to be. more...