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  • Youth
  • Youth (R)

    Do film directors really walk around peering at the world through the frame of their joined hands? more...
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  • You Will Be My Son (R)

    Great talent and a monstrous ego often come as a package deal, as illustrated by this insightful, taut 2011 drama set in Bordeaux. more...
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  • You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

    Alain Resnais reflects on some lifelong themes—the presence of history in contemporary life and the ability of art to remove us from time—and though this 2012 drama is characteristically eerie, it also conveys a calm that's rare in his work. more...
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  • Yoyo

    Pierre Etaix clowned for a circus before breaking into films, and his wonderful second feature (1965) pays loving tribute to a form of entertainment that was already being eclipsed by mass media. more...
  • You've Been Trumped (NR)

    If you still have any questions about the personal character of Donald Trump, check out this muckraking British documentary (2011) by Anthony Baxter about the tycoon's ongoing crusade to construct a billion-dollar golf resort in Aberdeenshire on the northeastern coast of Scotland. more...
  • You, the Living

    “Keaton-esque” hardly begins to describe this brutally deadpan comedy by Swedish director Roy Andersson (Songs From the Second Floor), who seems to have translated the entire range of human misery into a loosely connected series of slapstick gags. more...
  • Yella

    German filmmaker Christian Petzold (The State I Am In) has a gift for creating quiet, watchful characters, and his still waters run especially deep in Yella (Nina Hoss), a beautiful young woman chronically abused by men. more...
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  • Young Frankenstein (PG)

    More about the myth of Karloff than the monster, this Mel Brooks pastiche (1974) is probably his best early film: within limits, it has unity, pace, and even a dramatic interest of sorts. more...
  • Youth of the Beast

    This explosive 1963 gangland saga established Japanese B-movie director Seijun Suzuki as an auteur with domestic film buffs but also set him on a collision course with his employers at the Nikkatsu studio, who considered his themes bizarre and his stories incoherent. more...