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  • Teenage (NR)

    Matt Wolf directed this documentary (2013) about how teenagers have been portrayed and represented in the media and history books since the early 20th century. more...
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    Tehran, Tehran (NR)

    Iranian filmmakers Dariush Mehrjui (Hamoun) and Mehdi Karampour direct an episode apiece for this two-part dramatic anthology about the title city. more...
  • Tetro (NR)

    For his first original screenplay since The Conversation (1974), Francis Ford Coppola drew on memories of his parents, both classical musicians, and he invests the movie's early scenes, shot in black and white among the old-world architecture of Buenos Aires, with all the control and delicacy of a piano sonata. more...
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  • Theater of War (NR)

    A longtime admirer of Bertolt Brecht, documentary maker John Walter goes behind the scenes at the Public Theater's 2006 staging of Mother Courage and Her Children in Central Park. more...
  • Thermae Romae (NR)

    Based on a manga, this 2012 Japanese comedy follows an architect from ancient Rome who slips through time and resurfaces in a modern-day public bath in Japan. more...
  • These Amazing Shadows (NR)

    Signed into law by President Reagan in 1988, the National Film Preservation Act didn't actually fund the preservation of films, but it did establish the Library of Congress's National Film Registry, a list of historically significant works that's enlarged by 25 titles every year, and it prohibited the owners of these films from colorizing or otherwise altering them without alerting the public. more...
  • Things the Way They Are (NR)

    This resourceful low-budget drama from Chile begins as a gentle character study of a wealthy, emotionally repressed man who becomes infatuated with the sexy exchange student in his apartment building. more...
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  • The Third Man (NR)

    It once was praised as a sharply realistic study of American idealism (in the person of pulp novelist Joseph Cotten) crushed by European cynicism (embodied by war profiteer Orson Welles), but today it's the extravagant falsity that entertains—from Welles's "cuckoo clock" speech to the crazy camera angles and madly expressionist lighting chosen by director Carol Reed. more...