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  • The Spook Who Sat by the Door (PG)

    Possibly the most radical of the blaxploitation films of the 70s, this movie was an overnight success when released in 1973, then was abruptly taken out of distribution for reasons still not entirely clear. more...
  • Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over (PG)

    Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino return as married secret agents whose son (Daryl Sabara) and daughter (Alexa Vega) have become junior spies. more...
  • The Spy Next Door (PG)

    In middle age Jackie Chan can't keep coasting on boyish charm, as evidenced by this dreadful family comedy that does him no favors with its opening title sequence, a montage of action clips recalling earlier work where he performed most of his own complicated stunts and was genuinely funny as well. more...
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (PG)

    In this second Star Trek feature (1982), the crew of the Enterprise confronts middle age in a plot that makes very little literal sense but is packed with pertinent life-out-of-death, Waste Land imagery: a 200-year-old heavy (Ricardo Montalban) living on a barren planet, a secret project code-named “Genesis” that can turn deserts into tropical jungles, Captain Kirk wearing specs and rediscovering his long-lost family. more...
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (PG)

    After giving the director's chair to Leonard Nimoy for numbers three and four, and to William Shatner for number five, Paramount brought back Nicholas Meyer (Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan) for the original cast's final curtain call (1991). more...
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars (PG)

    Adapted from the Cartoon Network series and buffed up for the big screen with 3-D CGI, this Star Wars animation takes place in between Episode II—Attack of the Clones and Episode III—Revenge of the Sith, with Jedi knight Anakin Skywalker trying to forestall an intergalactic incident by rescuing the kidnapped son of Jabba the Hutt. more...
  • Starman (PG)

    It isn't pleasant to watch a talented filmmaker like John Carpenter willfully distort his personality to fit a commercial (read Spielbergian) profile, and only the opening suspense-horror sequences of ths 1984 feature have the weight of real involvement. more...
  • The Sting (PG)

    Top-notch entertainment (1973), pairing Paul Newman and Robert Redford as two penny-ante con men who set up a hilariously complex “Big Con” to fleece Irish gangster Robert Shaw out of half a million dollars in Depression-era Chicago. more...
  • Stony Island (PG)

    Tak Fujimoto's accomplished cinematography makes Chicago look nicely dark and dirty in this 1976 study of an incipient south-side band, but director Andy Davis, himself a working cameraman when he made this, neglects to supply a story or any real sense of continuity. more...
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