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  • Oasis

    Skating fearlessly on the edge of tastelessness and sentimentality, this 2002 South Korean feature is another strong, provocative film by Lee Chang-dong (Peppermint Candy), an edgy tale about a dense jailbird and a woman with cerebral palsy who grimace, grunt, and thrash their way toward an awkward but affecting last tango in a dingy Seoul apartment. more...
  • The Oath (NR)

    In this provocative documentary, Laura Poitras follows the divergent paths of two Yemeni friends who worked for Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan and contrasts the price each man paid for his proximity to the 9/11 hijackers. more...
  • Objectified

    Having brilliantly explored the world of typography in Helvetica (2007), British documentary maker Gary Hustwit turns his attention to industrial design, interviewing some two dozen artists and critics about the aesthetic and utilitarian principles that influence the shaping of everyday objects. more...
  • Objective, Burma!

    This 1944 war film is a very pure, almost abstract statement of Raoul Walsh's themes and style, with Errol Flynn as the leader of an American platoon sent on a jungle mission against the Japanese. more...
  • Oblivion

    Though active mostly in the Netherlands, the inspired documentary maker Heddy Honigmann (Forever) was born in Lima, Peru. more...
  • Occident

    Love fades but hope for a new life in the West flowers in this intricate, three-part Romanian comedy, the 2002 feature debut of writer-director Cristian Mungiu (4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days). more...
  • Occupation: Dreamland

    Filmmakers Garrett Scott and Ian Olds, embedded with the 82nd Airborne at Fallujah in the winter of 2004, offer a damning chronicle of failure and chaos. more...
  • October (Ten Days That Shook the World) (NR)

    Sergei Eisenstein was given a free hand and a mammoth budget to re-create the October Revolution for its tenth anniversary (1927), but the results displeased the authorities—for reasons both political (Trotsky, suddenly banished from the Soviet Union, had to be hurriedly eliminated from the final cut) and aesthetic (Eisenstein's extreme formalism, here at its most abstract and theoretical). more...
  • October Country (NR)

    Documentary maker Michael Palmieri and photographer Donal Mosher collaborated on this grimly sympathetic movie about Mosher's down-and-out family in upstate New York. more...
  • Odd Man Out (NR)

    A wounded Irish revolutionary (James Mason at his near best) on the run in Belfast encounters a cross section of human responses—self-interest, indifference, empathy, and charity—in this arty 1946 English thriller directed by Carol Reed and adapted by F.L. Green and R.C. Sherriff from Green's novel. more...
  • Oedipus Rex

    One of the most underrated, neglected, and powerful of Pier Paolo Pasolini's features, this 1967 film, shot in Morocco, is a retelling of the Sophocles tragedy that begins in antiquity and ends in the 20th century, with references to both the fascist period in Italy and Pasolini's own life. more...
  • Of Gods and Men (R)

    No one knows for sure what happened to the seven French monks who were kidnapped during the Algerian civil war and found dead in May 1996. more...
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  • Of Time and the City

    Terence Davies, England's greatest living filmmaker, has released only six features, and this one is his first documentary, a mesmerizing and eloquent essay about his native Liverpool. more...