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  • Infernal Affairs II

    The second installment of Andrew Lau and Alan Mak's Hong Kong-based trilogy is a prequel that brings two of the previous film's characters, police inspector Wong (Anthony Wong) and triad underboss Sam (Eric Tsang), to the forefront, revealing how their guarded respect for each other deteriorated into a bitter personal feud. more...
  • Informe General

    Documenting the last gasp of the Franco regime, Pere Portabella's 1977 film devotes most of its 158-minute running time to Spaniards' answers to the question “How do you envisage the change from a dictatorship to a democratic government?” This starts off with an eerie tour of Franco's tomb that suggests a color remake of Portabella's 1970 masterpiece Cuadecuc-Vampir, then proceeds with footage of 1976 demonstrations in Barcelona and Madrid, archival propaganda, and discussions with socialists, communists, union representatives, lawyers, engineers, and artists, among others. more...
  • The Informer

    The inflated reputation of John Ford's moody, heavily symbolic 1935 drama has rightly been put into perspective by critics who now recognize that Ford went on to greater things over the next 30 years. more...
  • Inglourious Basterds (R)

    Quentin Tarantino's long-awaited action flick (2009) isn't a World War II movie—it's a movie about World War II movies and, by extension, how the Third Reich has become a beloved fixture of American pop culture. more...
  • Inni (NR)

    I've never witnessed Icelandic post-rockers Sigur Ros live, but I did attend the first Chicago date of front man Jon Thor "Jonsi" Birgisson's solo tour in April of 2010. more...
  • Innocence (NR)

    A moody, self-dramatizing 14-year-old accuses her middle-aged doctor of having violated her sexually. more...
  • Innocent

    This downbeat video drama by writer-director Simon Chung is worth a look for its glimpse of Chinese-Canadian life—and for Timothy Lee's enigmatic performance as Eric, a Hong Kong teen who immigrates to Toronto with his family in search of a better life. more...
  • The Innocent

    Though it wasn't terribly well received when it first appeared, Luchino Visconti's last film (1979) strikes me as arguably the greatest of his late works apart from The Leopard—a withering autocritique of masculine vanity and self-delusion, adapted from a novel by Gabriele D'Annunzio, focusing on a well-to-do intellectual (Giancarlo Giannini) at the turn of the century struggling to justify his sexual double standards and his libertarian philosophy regarding his wife (Laura Antonelli) and his mistress (Jennifer O'Neill). more...
  • Innocent Voices

    Screenwriter Oscar Torres based this gripping drama on his own childhood in rural El Salvador, where children as young as 12 were conscripted into government forces battling the insurgent FMLN. more...
  • Inquietude

    Born in 1908, Portuguese writer-director Manoel de Oliveira is the world's oldest living film master, which makes it all the more astonishing that he's averaged one feature a year since the 80s. more...
  • Inquiring Nuns

    In this fascinating 1968 documentary, one of the earliest by Kartemquin Films, two outgoing Catholic nuns, Sister Marie Arne and Sister Mary Campion, walk around Chicago asking people if they're happy. more...
  • Inshallah, Football

    The most powerful voice in this 2010 documentary belongs to Bashir Baba, a former Kashmiri militant who was held and tortured in the region's notorious Papa II prison for two years in the early 1990s. more...
  • Inside a Change (NR)

    Like Spike Lee’s 25th Hour, this thoughtful urban drama follows a young New Yorker (Ephraim Benton) during his final day of freedom before going to jail for dealing dope. more...
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