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Buddy Guy's Legends (map)
700 S. Wabash Ave.
South Loop
phone 312-427-1190

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Elastic (map)
2830 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Avondale
phone 773-772-3616

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Rosa's Lounge (map)
3420 W. Armitage Ave.
Logan Square
phone 773-342-0452

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Double Door (map)
1572 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Wicker Park/Bucktown
phone 773-489-3160

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Cole's (map)
2338 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Logan Square
phone 773-276-5802

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Smart Bar (map)
3730 N. Clark St.
Wrigleyville
phone 773-549-4140

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Concord Music Hall (map)
2047 N. Milwaukee
Logan Square
phone 773-570-4000

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Sliink, Green Lantern, Twrk

Sat., Aug. 30, 10 p.m.
Sound-Bar (map)
226 W. Ontario St.
River North
phone 312-787-4480

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Lincoln Hall (map)
2424 N. Lincoln Ave.
Lincoln Park
phone 773-525-2501

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Schubas (map)
3159 N. Southport Ave.
Lakeview
phone 773-525-2508

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African Festival of the Arts: Harriett Tubman Band, Salif Keita, Queen Bunmi, and others

Sun., Aug. 31, 10 a.m.

Like most African stars, Salif Keita—arguably the greatest Malian singer of the past half century—has sought a global audience by experimenting with (and occasionally struggling with) hybrids that marry the traditions of his homeland with various flavors of Western pop. On his most recent album, Talé (Universal), Keita submits the music of his Mandinka roots to the ministrations of producer Philippe Cohen Solal, best known from Parisian electro-tango outfit Gotan Project, who enlists a slew of guest singers, including British MC Roots Manuva, American jazz bassist Esperanza Spalding, and a cappella icon Bobby McFerrin. Solal uses a variety of electronic rhythms and effects, among them stuttering dubstep (“C’est Bon, C’est Bon”), anthemic four-on-the-floor kick drum (“Natty”), and accelerating-and-decelerating ambient washes (“Après Demain”). It’s a testament to the power of Keita’s soaring, protean voice that it’s unhindered by such unrewarding genre exercises. The album does better with fusions that feel like they’re looking for connections, not chasing trends: “Samfi,” for instance, collides Gnawan grooves with a prominent sample of the organ part from the B-52s’ “Planet Claire,” and “Tassi” mixes Sade-style soul with percolating Afro-Cuban rhythms. The core band on Talé includes Mamane Diabaté on balafon and Aboussi Cissoko on n’goni, and Keita’s imperturbably soulful singing never conceals its West African heritage. His voice is the only essential part of his music, and for this rare local performance, free of the guest singers and the high-end Paris studio, it should be front and center. —Peter Margasak This set is part of the African Festival of the Arts; 6:45 PM, Dee Parmer Woodtor Main Stage. $20, $10 in advance, $30 for families, $30 weekend pass, $75 for silver VIP, $200 for silver VIP weekend pass, $100 for gold VIP, $300 for gold VIP weekend pass

Washington Park (map)
51st and Cottage Grove
Hyde Park
phone 773-256-1248
African Festival of the Arts: Harriett Tubman Band, Salif Keita, Queen Bunmi, and others

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North Coast Music Festival: Snoop Dogg, Dada Life, Floozies, Zeds Dead, and others

Sun., Aug. 31, 1 p.m.

These days Snoop Dogg is retiring his hip-hop persona to make reggae as Snoop Lion, but in the late aughts he starred in Snoop Dogg’s Father Hood, a comedy-of-errors reality show that followed him as he taught his kids soccer, attempted to grasp yoga, and tackled other mundane tasks. In other words, Snoop is deep in the bumbling-father twilight of his career, a la Ozzy Osbourne—given his current status as a goofy pop-culture icon, it’s almost hard to remember that he was one of the first gangsta-rap superstars. When Snoop appeared on Dr. Dre’s 1992 debut solo album, The Chronic, he was the stand-out personality: a 21-year-old Crip, in and out of jail, he embodied the public’s notion of Compton’s gang culture with his tough image and hard-core lyrics. With his own debut, 1993’s Doggystyle (produced by Dre, always his finest collaborator), he not only proved that he had massive crossover star power but also that he was one of the greatest rappers of all time: he was brilliant, hilarious, and intimidating, and his flow had a singsong catchiness and impossibly smooth coolness that nobody’s quite matched before or since. Over the past two decades, the quality of Snoop’s recorded output has fallen off steeply—the realness in his lyrics is totally gone—but his huge persona and his ease on the mike still make him an excellent live performer. —Luca Cimarusti This set is part of the North Coast Music Festival; 9 PM, 312 Stage. $69, three-day passes sold out

Union Park (map)
1501 W. Randolph St.
Near West Side
phone 312-746-5494
North Coast Music Festival: Snoop Dogg, Dada Life, Floozies, Zeds Dead, and others

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Luke Bryan, Dierks Bentley, Lee Brice

Sun., Aug. 31, 6 p.m.

The conversation around current country music tends to assume that dudes with “chicks” and “beer” at the top of their to-do lists dominate the landscape, but the rush to cede that territory to the bros has shoved aside a few men who take breaks from partying for relatively introspective moments. Take Arizona native Dierks Bentley and his current single, “Drunk on a Plane,” from his seventh album, Riser (Capitol). The tune’s title spoils much of its story, sure, but the reasons the narrator has had a few go beyond “because the bar cart was there,” which gives it an aw-shucks pathos reminiscent of country’s best drinking songs. Throughout his career, Bentley has split the difference between arena-ready anthems and miniature narratives, and onstage he can turn a somber track such as the bluegrass-tinged “Up on the Ridge” into something that can fill a stadium. This summer Bentley has opened a couple dates for his old pal Luke Bryan, the king of bro country, who kicked off the current leg of his That’s My Kind of Night tour in May—and whose series of self-assured EPs about spring break can’t quite conceal his rough edges and goofiness. If Bentley’s previous appearances are any indication, Bryan will probably bring him out for a song or two during his headlining set. —Maura Johnston $24-$86

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Soldier Field (map)
1410 S. Museum Campus Dr.
Museum Campus
phone 312-235-7000
Luke Bryan, Dierks Bentley, Lee Brice

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Laurence Hobgood

Sun., Aug. 31, 10 a.m.
Pianoforte Studios (map)
1335 S. Michigan
South Loop

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