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Folk & Country Search – Soundboard

3 total results

Luke Bryan, Dierks Bentley, Lee Brice

Sun., Aug. 31, 6 p.m.

The conversation around current country music tends to assume that dudes with “chicks” and “beer” at the top of their to-do lists dominate the landscape, but the rush to cede that territory to the bros has shoved aside a few men who take breaks from partying for relatively introspective moments. Take Arizona native Dierks Bentley and his current single, “Drunk on a Plane,” from his seventh album, Riser (Capitol). The tune’s title spoils much of its story, sure, but the reasons the narrator has had a few go beyond “because the bar cart was there,” which gives it an aw-shucks pathos reminiscent of country’s best drinking songs. Throughout his career, Bentley has split the difference between arena-ready anthems and miniature narratives, and onstage he can turn a somber track such as the bluegrass-tinged “Up on the Ridge” into something that can fill a stadium. This summer Bentley has opened a couple dates for his old pal Luke Bryan, the king of bro country, who kicked off the current leg of his That’s My Kind of Night tour in May—and whose series of self-assured EPs about spring break can’t quite conceal his rough edges and goofiness. If Bentley’s previous appearances are any indication, Bryan will probably bring him out for a song or two during his headlining set. —Maura Johnston $24-$86

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Soldier Field (map)
1410 S. Museum Campus Dr.
Museum Campus
phone 312-235-7000
Luke Bryan, Dierks Bentley, Lee Brice

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Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Corb Lund & the Hurtin' Albertans

Sun., Sept. 7, 7 p.m.

Singer and guitarist Corb Lund, a reverent student of American roots music, has become a minor star in his native Canada, but he’s struggling to build a following in the States. Thanks to a record deal with New West, that seems to be changing: because some of his earliest songs aren’t available in the U.S., Lund recently released Counterfeit Blues, a collection of 12 rerecorded tunes dating back to 2002, cut at Sun Studio in a quick two-day session that gives them a scrappy immediacy. Perhaps because he’s an outsider, he sounds comfortable in his own skin as he surveys a wide range of American folk and country styles from very different eras—the slap-bass rockabilly of “Big Butch Bass Bull Fiddle,” the western swing of “Little Foothills Heaven,” the honky-tonk of “Buckin’ Horse Rider,” the Bob Dylan-via-Woody Guthrie rhythms of “Truck Got Stuck,” and the outlaw-style 70s country of “Good Copenhagen” (which refers to chewing tobacco, not the Danish city). Lund’s a bit of a formalist, but he’s got a great set of pipes and a convincing ear for twang—for now at least, I’m still listening. —Peter Margasak $24, $22 for members

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Maurer Hall, Old Town School of Folk Music (map)
4544 N. Lincoln Ave.
Ravenswood
phone 773-728-6000
Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Corb Lund & the Hurtin' Albertans

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Florida Georgia Line

Tue., Sept. 9, 9 p.m.

Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard claim to get a fair amount of guff in Nashville circles for adding hints of hip-hop and arena rock to Florida Georgia Line’s brand of country, but the occasional rapped verse or Mutt Lange-worthy beat only makes their band sound more like, well, America. “Cruise,” their top-five come-on to a lady who’s as perfect as a song, is a well-mixed oleo of the hyperproduced twang-pop of Rascal Flatts and the more laid-back work of guest star Nelly (“Ride Wit Me,” “Where the Party At”), topped off with cred-boosting references to trucks and Marshall Tucker. Even on “Party People” (from their debut full-length, 2012’s Here’s to the Good Times), where they give props to David Lee Roth and “country in the rap beat,” they cloak their boom-bap in fingerpicking and southern accents. Florida Georgia Line’s second album, coming in October on Republic Nashville, is called Anything Goes, which suggests that they want to stay on message as rule breakers. But the first single, the ballad “Dirt,” is a thoughtful rumination about the circle of life—and its devotion to the traditional is so through-and-through that it uses a 10 percent down payment on a house as an indication of forthcoming romantic commitment. —Maura Johnston $35

Aragon Ballroom (map)
1106 W. Lawrence Ave.
Uptown
phone 773-561-9500 or 866-448-7849
Florida Georgia Line

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