Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Rich families, poor neighborhoods

Posted By on 08.10.11 at 03:07 PM

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Affluent black and Latino families are more likely to live in poor neighborhoods than are affluent whites, according to a new Brown University study that Megan Cottrell reported on earlier this week:

White families in Chicago making more than $75,000 a year live in neighborhoods where only 7.6 percent of their neighbors make considerably less money—$40,000 a year or less. But black families at the same income level have more than twice as many neighbors—17.9 percent—making less than $40,000, and wealthy Hispanic families have nearly double the white percentage at 12.7 percent.

Study director John Logan also said that the trends he identified—the project used 2005-2009 census data—align with existing residential segregation patterns, which we reported on at length earlier this year. Those trends are more pronounced in Chicago than in other metropolitan areas: "In Chicago, wealthy white families have fewer poor neighbors, and black families more, when compared with New York and Los Angeles."

Other neighborhood news: Carol Felsenthal reports today that proposed United States Postal Service office closures would hit two local congressional districts particularly hard: Bobby Rush’s and Danny Davis’s. Davis argues that lack of revenue shouldn’t be a criteria for closure: “How many packages are you going to mail? My constituents don’t buy anything. They get maybe $700 a month and are scared of cuts in Medicare. You have no reason to go to the post office—except the very important reason, to pick up your check. Of course these facilities don’t generate revenue.”

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